Amazon Kindle Fire Review

Amazon Kindle Fire

Amazon Kindle FireMany people consider tablets as a part of their guilty pleasure; they spend $600 for a large touchscreen device while they can achieve the same level of productivity with a smaller $150 smartphone. However, with the Amazon Kindle Fire you’ll feel a little less guilty. While Amazon’s tablet won’t replace a full-blown computer, it is still a fun hub for personal entertainments and basic productivity tasks. Only at $199, Amazon Kindle Fire significantly undercuts Apple iPad’s price. You should consider that for the basic model of iPad 2’s with $499 price tag, you can buy two units of Kindle Fire and still have some cash left over to purchase a few apps.

Its 7” form factor is executed far more effectively than early model of Galaxy Tab and the BlackBerry Playbook. The tablet feels comfortable in hand yet solid. There are also a few features that seem to defy the affordable price point such as the dual-core 1GHz Cortex-A9 processor and PowerVR SGX540 GPU. Additionally, it has a refreshing user interface and a slightly more closed environment than the rest of Android community to ensure better security and compatibility with apps. Kindle Fire uses a heavily modified form of Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) and Amazon chose not to integrate the tablet with Google Play (previously Android Market) to ensure full compatibility with the customized OS, instead users are directed to Amazon Appstore for Android.  If you’re tired of using the sluggish stock Android browser, you’ll be impressed with the Silk browser.

Because of the bargain basement price point, you could go a little easier on Kindle Fire’s limitations and drawbacks. Amazon’s decision to omit common features like bigger internal storage, microSD card slot, GPS, Bluetooth, 3G connectivity, microphone and cameras were intended to keep the price down. To negate the paltry 8GB of internal storage, you can keep most of your files in the cloud.

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